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Sep 262017
 

Organization: CARE Australia
Country: Viet Nam
Closing date: 29 Sep 2017

· Based in Hanoi, Vietnam

· Fixed Term (2 years with possible extension), Full time

CARE is a leading international humanitarian aid organisation fighting global poverty, with a special focus on working with women and girls to bring lasting change to their communities.

The Country program Advisor/Business Development provides extensive technical support to CARE International in Vietnam, to enhance programme development and fundraising with organisational priorities. The role is responsible for developing the skills and capacity of national in designing, monitoring and evaluation of program quality including gender equality and women empowerment approaches.

To be successful in this position you will be a proven leader and experienced in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation with relevant overseas aid experience. Your experience in capacity building of staff will be complemented by your excellent liaison and negotiation skills including the ability to build and maintain networks and relationships. A demonstrated understanding of gender equality and women’s empowerment, including ability to respond effectively to challenges, work effectively in a cross-functional, diverse and busy team environment with minimal supervision will set you apart from others.

How to apply:

To view the Candidate Information Pack, please refer to the following link: http://www.care.org.au/CountryProgramAdvisorJob

How to apply

please visit the CARE Australia website**,** www.care.org.au

Questions about the role?

Please contact Le Kim Dung, CARE International Country Director on +84 4 3716 1930 Ext. 168 or LeKim.Dung@careint.org (please do not email applications to this address).

Applications Close: 12:01am (AEST), Friday 29 September 2017 ource:0;}

click here for more details and apply to position

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