EUCOOKIELAW_BANNER_TITLE

Nov 292017
 

Organization: United Nations Population Fund
Country: Viet Nam
Closing date: 07 Dec 2017

The UNFPA Viet Nam Country Office is seeking an international consultant and a national consultant with expertise on gender, human rights and law to conduct the review of 10 year implementation of Gender Equality Law. The international consultant will use the international human rights normative frameworks as the analytical frameworks to identify gaps while the national consultant will focus on gaps within the legislation and its implementation.

Working duration: from December 2017 – 31st December 2018.

Working place: Home-based and Viet Nam (Hanoi & some provinces)

How to apply:

Interested candidates are invited to submit:

· Statement of Interests

· Updated Curriculum Vitae and signed UN Personal History form (P-11)

· Certification or Recommendation of agency that is employing the candidate (if any)

Please email to:

Ms. Pham Thi Huong Thuy, Programme Associate

UNFPA Country Office in Viet Nam

Email: thtpham@unfpa.org

with subject title:

“International consultant for review of GE Law – {Full Name of Applicant}” or

“National consultant for review of GE Law – {Full Name of Applicant}”

Submission Deadline: 15h00 (Hanoi Time, GMT+7) on 7 December 2017

For more information on UNFPA Viet Nam, Terms of Reference, application procedures and P11 form, please visit our website at *http://vietnam.unfpa.org/en/submission/international-consultant-and-national-consultant-review-10-year-implementation-gender** **

Notice: There is no application, processing or other fee at any stage of the application process. UNFPA does not solicit or screen for information in respect of HIV or AIDS and does not discriminate on the basis of HIV/AIDS status. **

click here for more details and apply to position

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